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nov ch tk   dec chtk

Stop by cool Summer Treat!

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Share your favorite dessert recipe and win…

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4 Secrets to Slurpable Soup

soup111.  Start With Delicious Liquid

The vast majority of the time, the liquid in soup is stock or broth. Best to use homemade, but if you buy mass-produced broth, dilute it with water (about 4 parts broth to 1 part water) and find a brand sold in boxes instead of cans to avoid a slight tinny taste.

2.  Sweat the Aromatics

Aromatics include onions, leeks, garlic, and often celery and carrots. Cooking them over low to medium heat in the pan before adding any liquid will help soften their texture and blend their flavors. Cook, stirring occasionally, until they are soft but not browning, about 5 minutes. The goal is to break down their cellulose (making them easier to eat or purée later) and get them to give off some of their liquid, which will deepen the flavor of the soup.

3.  Salt in Layers

Canned and prepared soups are known to be high in sodium. There’s a reason: all that water takes a lot of salt to flavor! The difference between soul-satisfying homemade soup and “why did I bother?” homemade soup is often in the salt. Cooks, afraid of over-salting, create pots of soup just a teaspoon or two shy of proper seasoning.

Salt soup as chefs do… in layers. Add some salt to the aromatics and other vegetables as you cook them. If you’re cooking the meat separately, make sure it is well seasoned before it goes into the pot. And, most importantly, taste it before serving and add salt until you taste a hike-up in flavor, then stop.

4. Hit It With Freshness

You’ve used great ingredients. You’ve cooked and salted them properly. How to make the most of it all before it hits the table? Add a bit of something fresh right at the end. Fresh herbs, fresh citrus juice, a dollop or two of cream. A hit of something un-cooked and un-simmered will highlight the deep, delicious, melded flavors in the rest of the soup.

There has to be a better way!
When we were kids, eating Corned Beef Hash meant opening up a can to find something that looked like dog food. As we grew up and got into the restaurant business, we figured there HAS to be a better way to make it!

We think we’ve found it. We spend over 3 hours making our FRESH Corned Beef Hash from scratch. It starts with us roasting a corned beef that has been coated with our favorite ingredients. Then we shred it by hand and mix it with onions and other spices. It is a favorite! Don’t believe us, try it for yourself.

1hash

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Valentine’s Day Specials

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New Years Day Tradition

 
Serving Pork & Sauerkraut New Years Day….
 
PA Dutch Tradition…pork & kraut
says it’s good luck to eat pork for the new year because pigs forage forward for their food and don’t look back. In years past, food in the larder for winter was the equivalent of prosperity. Having a hog to slaughter and pork to eat at New Year’s meant a family would have food for the winter months. Because cabbage is a late fall crop, the most efficient way to preserve it for the winter was by turning it into sauerkraut. Brining cabbage takes 6 to 8 weeks, which means that October kraut would be ready to eat just as the new year was arriving.

Chalk Talk Event Recap

Recap from the Dinner & Chalk Talk Presentation. Thank You to all our guests for making it a successful evening!
History of “Chalk Talk:
“Chalk Talk” is a monologue presentation done while the speaker draws.  The roots of Chalk Talk can be traced to the Methodist church in the mid-eighteen hundreds.  Today, Chalk Talks are being revived as a method of conveying scripture visually by evangelists who have artistic ability.
Please take a look at Joe Hurst’s Chalk Talk Video and check back for another session in the spring.
Chalk Talk Presentation by Joe Hurst
 
more info on Joe & Elva’s Chalk Talk Presentations visit their site: http://elvaschalkart.com/
 
pplIMG_0239 chalk talk